In the bright sunny south and peace and content,

These days of my boyhood I scarcely have spent,

From the deep following spring to the broad flowing stream,

Ever dear to my memory, sweeter is my dream.


Bright Sunny South (2013) by Sam Amidon

seanlewisdraws:

Prints for sale! If you have inquiries or requests for specific dimensions please email me at seanislewis@gmail.com

Special thanks to Bill Grigsby at Reactor for printing help, Celtie Ferguson for cropping and Yuan Zhang for documenting!!

my friend’s fantastic paintings are now available in print! Splash some colour on your wall and support a local toronto artist :)

13 Feb 2014 Reblogged from seanlewisdraws

Polish Patterns III (2012) by Kacper Kowalski

Polish Patterns III (2012) by Kacper Kowalski

Spring IV (2009) by Kacper Kowalski

Spring IV (2009) by Kacper Kowalski

Plus Minus I (2010) by Kacper Kowalski

Plus Minus I (2010) by Kacper Kowalski

I gave her Pink Floyd, Animals when we were in sixth grade.
And it was on her turntable when I met her on Sunday.
Her mom was gone, and we were listening to Dogs.
She reached down my pants and discovered I was bald.
Then when I touched her down there she was blossoming and soft.
And the next day at school she ignored me in the halls.


- Dogs (2014) by Sun Kil Moon

"I’ve been in the Rue de Lancry, listening to chamber music,’ he said. ‘Schumann. Things… oh! you can’t imagine what they were like! Things that get you here, somehow, at the back of your head, like a woman breathing down your neck…. Not like a kiss…. No, more insubstantial than that… a breath, a soft, faint breath. Oh! it’s like… like feeling your soul going out of your body!’"

L’œuvre - The Masterpiece (1886) by Émile Zola

"Do you see what I mean? Perhaps that’s what we need now, sunlight, open air, something bright and fresh, people and things as seen in real day-light. I don’t know, but it seems to me that that’s our sort of painting, the sort of painting our generation should produce and look at."

L’œuvre - The Masterpiece (1886) by Émile Zola

"His voice sounded suddenly so different that the other two stopped at once, while he, after scraping off the head of his nude figure, drew it afresh and painted it in again after the drawing of Christine, though his hand was feverish, uncertain and often clumsy. From the head he went on to the breasts, which as yet were barely sketched in. This keyed him up even more, for, chaste as he was, he had a passion for the physical beauty of women, an insane love for nudity desired but never possessed, but was powerless to satisfy himself or to create enough of the beauty he dreamed of enfolding in an ecstatic embrace. The women he hustled out of his studio he adored in his pictures. He caressed them, did them violence even, and shed tears of despair over his failures to make them either sufficiently beautiful or sufficiently alive."

L’œuvre - The Masterpiece (1886) by Émile Zola

"In his blind fury he was about to put his fist through his canvas, but his friends restrained him just in time. It was childish, they said, to flare up like that. What good would it do him to ruin his work and regret it ever afterwards? Claude, quivering with wrath, made no reply, but stood glaring at the picture, his eyes burning with the unspeakable torture of his impotence. His hands had refused once more to produce anything clear or lifelike; the woman’s bosom he had been painting was simply a dauby mess of dull colour, the flesh he worshipped and had dreamed of reproducing with such brilliance was drab and lifeless… What drove him to distraction was the infuriating thought of the hereditary something, he did not know what, that sometimes made creation a sheer pleasure and at other times reduced him to such complete sterility that he forgot the very basics of drawing. It was like being swept up into some sickening vortex and filled with the urge to create while everything was being swirled away from one— pride in one’s work, hopes of success, the very meaning of one’s life!"

L’œuvre - The Masterpiece (1886) by Émile Zola

"He lay back on the bed and, as he gazed into space, talked on, his voice warm with enthusiasm. ‘Life! Life! Life! What it is to feel it and paint it as it really is! To love it for its own sake; to see how it might be “improved” by being emasculated. To understand that its so-called defects are really signs of character. To put life into things, and put life into men! That’s the only way to be a God!’"

L’œuvre - The Masterpiece (1886) by Émile Zola

Untitled (2013) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2013) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2013) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2013) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2013) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2013) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2010) by Juergen Kollmorgen

Untitled (2010) by Juergen Kollmorgen