Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt
“It has to do with the pace of the shoot, and the environment. Oregon is so spacious, and the forest speaks so much of its own. The sound design is very inclusive, very environmental, and beyond the pinning down of who they are. Hopefully a lot of what is coming through has to do with their body language, the way they put up a tent together or walk across a log and the spectator can read as much into that as in what they are saying.
If it was overcast we shot in Portland, and if it was sunny we went to the forest. And as you get to know the forest you bring more and more of the forest into the shoot, and as we got deeper and deeper into the forest we began shooting in a way that they become more and more part of the forest. This is one of the central ideas of the film: they get lost in the forest and they become part of it and one with nature. At the same time, they become a bit more vulnerable with each other, and then the forest just starts to take over." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt

It has to do with the pace of the shoot, and the environment. Oregon is so spacious, and the forest speaks so much of its own. The sound design is very inclusive, very environmental, and beyond the pinning down of who they are. Hopefully a lot of what is coming through has to do with their body language, the way they put up a tent together or walk across a log and the spectator can read as much into that as in what they are saying.

If it was overcast we shot in Portland, and if it was sunny we went to the forest. And as you get to know the forest you bring more and more of the forest into the shoot, and as we got deeper and deeper into the forest we began shooting in a way that they become more and more part of the forest. This is one of the central ideas of the film: they get lost in the forest and they become part of it and one with nature. At the same time, they become a bit more vulnerable with each other, and then the forest just starts to take over." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt
“I think of Mark as this guy who really wants world peace, but at the end of the day he can’t even be totally forthcoming and honest and giving to his wife or to a good old friend. He listens to the radio almost like an activity, as if he’s pulling something off or contributing in some way, and I’m guilty of all of that. So I relate to Mark. The way he just gets back in the car and flicks on the comfort of that zone where you can just feel really righteous — I relate to that. But I relate to Kurt too, someone who is not tied down, who moves around from thing to thing, whatever that is… These days, it’s hard to say. I’m more of a worrier, so I’m probably more like Mark. Unfortunately." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt

I think of Mark as this guy who really wants world peace, but at the end of the day he can’t even be totally forthcoming and honest and giving to his wife or to a good old friend. He listens to the radio almost like an activity, as if he’s pulling something off or contributing in some way, and I’m guilty of all of that. So I relate to Mark. The way he just gets back in the car and flicks on the comfort of that zone where you can just feel really righteous — I relate to that. But I relate to Kurt too, someone who is not tied down, who moves around from thing to thing, whatever that is… These days, it’s hard to say. I’m more of a worrier, so I’m probably more like Mark. Unfortunately." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt
“When I was driving around the country, even when I wasn’t in that particular spot [Bagby], there’d be a lot of walking in the woods, location scouting, just me and my dog. I would get out of my car and just go walk in these forests that at a certain point lead to a spring or a swimming hole…  Our script was very short — 49 pages — so I always knew it was going to expand… The way we were shooting, we had a six-person crew. The plan was always to keep the size of the crew minimal and the whole apparatus really small so that when we were in this big space the script could expand. That would allow for points where Mark and Kurt were smaller, less featured in the woods, like when they’re starting to talk more and reveal more about themselves." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt

When I was driving around the country, even when I wasn’t in that particular spot [Bagby], there’d be a lot of walking in the woods, location scouting, just me and my dog. I would get out of my car and just go walk in these forests that at a certain point lead to a spring or a swimming hole…  Our script was very short — 49 pages — so I always knew it was going to expand… The way we were shooting, we had a six-person crew. The plan was always to keep the size of the crew minimal and the whole apparatus really small so that when we were in this big space the script could expand. That would allow for points where Mark and Kurt were smaller, less featured in the woods, like when they’re starting to talk more and reveal more about themselves." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt
“When you are younger is easier to bond with your friends, and then your respective paths for some reason separate. This is what happens to these two characters. Kurt’s way of life is much more accepted as romantic when you are in your twenties. But, of course, he is past that. He is in his late thirties and people are very opinionated about him. He walks a fine line: at what point are you a wanderer and what point are you homeless
In my view, Kurt is actually more open and honest than Mark." - Kelly Reichardt
“[All] records I think of as cinematic experiences, both in their construction and ideally in the listening." - Will Oldham

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt

When you are younger is easier to bond with your friends, and then your respective paths for some reason separate. This is what happens to these two characters. Kurt’s way of life is much more accepted as romantic when you are in your twenties. But, of course, he is past that. He is in his late thirties and people are very opinionated about him. He walks a fine line: at what point are you a wanderer and what point are you homeless

In my view, Kurt is actually more open and honest than Mark." - Kelly Reichardt

[All] records I think of as cinematic experiences, both in their construction and ideally in the listening." - Will Oldham

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt
“For me, keeping the apparatus small is how I work best. I would never want a crew of 13 again, as on River of Grass. I don’t want a crew of 10. I just want to make a film where there are no walkie-talkies or Blackberrys. I just want to go off with a group of friends. I’m better at making films that are private environments. It’s less excess, which means I won’t have a dolly shot, but that’s okay.
All of the tension or drama in my films happens in minute moments — a comment or a glance. You can easily miss them... My stories are really small, which is why I keep the filmmaking small — focusing on the particular, because it’s not going to appeal to everybody." - Kelly Reichardt

Old Joy (2006) dir. Kelly Reichardt

For me, keeping the apparatus small is how I work best. I would never want a crew of 13 again, as on River of Grass. I don’t want a crew of 10. I just want to make a film where there are no walkie-talkies or Blackberrys. I just want to go off with a group of friends. I’m better at making films that are private environments. It’s less excess, which means I won’t have a dolly shot, but that’s okay.

All of the tension or drama in my films happens in minute moments — a comment or a glance. You can easily miss them... My stories are really small, which is why I keep the filmmaking small — focusing on the particular, because it’s not going to appeal to everybody." - Kelly Reichardt

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Portuguese Man of War (2014) by Aaron Ansarov

Oh, Great Equator,
City of sound, 
All we have in a single frame,
For the first time,
Oh, my loves, I wish you could see,
What I’ve seen, 
Or should I spend my days, 
In empty pyramids,
And do what the echo-chamber says.

Great Equator (2014) by Zammuto

It’s a foolish game, ain’t no reason for, a trite little concept, a fabrication.

I need it anyway, because it’s the shape of things to come.

Sat down, with closed eyes, took a deep breath, under a big sky, I was eviscerated, it pulled my guts out.

Turn the movies off, there’s enough to see.

We all want the same things, for our family, and I’ll be agitated, til I cross the Mississippi.”

The Shape of Things To Come (2012) by Zammuto 

Sanma No Aji - An Autumn Afternoon (1962) dir. Yasujiro Ozu

Sanma No Aji - An Autumn Afternoon (1962) dir. Yasujiro Ozu

Sanma No Aji - An Autumn Afternoon (1962) dir. Yasujiro Ozu

Sanma No Aji - An Autumn Afternoon (1962) dir. Yasujiro Ozu

Sanma No Aji - An Autumn Afternoon (1962) dir. Yasujiro Ozu

Sanma No Aji - An Autumn Afternoon (1962) dir. Yasujiro Ozu

Midorikawa hesitantly began playing “’Round Midnight.” At first he played each chord carefully, cautiously, like a person sticking his toes into a stream, testing the swiftness of the water and searching for a foothold. After playing the main theme, he started a long improvisation. As time went by, his fingers became more agile, more generous, in their movements, like fish swimming in clear water. The left hand inspired the right, the right hand spurred on the left. Haida’s father didn’t know much about jazz, but he did happen to be familiar with this Thelonious Monk composition, and Midorikawa’s performance went straight to the heart of the piece. His playing was so soulful it made Haida forget about the piano’s erratic tuning. As he listened to the music in this junior-high music room deep in the mountains, as the sole audience for the performance, Haida felt all that was unclean inside him washed away. The straightforward beauty of the music overlapped with the fresh, oxygen-rich air and the cool, clear water of the stream, all of them acting in concert. Midorikawa, too, was lost in his playing, as if all the minutiae of reality has disappeared. Haida had never seen someone so thoroughly absorbed in what he was doing. He couldn’t take his eyes off Midorikawa’s ten fingers, which moved like independent, living creatures.

Colourless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage (2014) by Haruki Murakami // ‘Round Midnight (1941) by Thelonious Monk